Tag Archives: Monroe militia

revolution recapping: the children’s crusade

Previously on Revolution: Sex and Drugs

I found this episode just as fulfilling, mesmerizing, and inspiring as its previous installments. Take from that what you will.

Plot
Charlie and the gang take on an impossible mission to save a boy seized by the militia (Peter played by Griffin Freeman) . In a plan of stunning clarity and vision, Charlie decides the best way to do this is by entering the belly of the beast, aka the big brainwashing ship the Monroe militia uses to indoctrinate their new recruits. Things go badly, of course, and Charlie ends up being branded with the militia “M” and Aaron accidentally turns on a lighthouse with the magical pendant this show more or less hinges upon. By the end of the episode, however, everyone escapes, including the boy everyone was trying to save. Hooray.

Over at the Monroe Reupiblic, Rachel feels bad for giving away the secret about the necklaces to Monroe (see what I said about hinging?) We find out in her flashback that her husband accidentally created what would be become the Big Off Switch of the World in an attempt to actually make a new type of clean energy. The government apparently liked it (that’s new) enough to send their man Randall to convince Rachel and her husband through silly domineering tactics that they just “want to be friends,” i.e. get their grubby hands all over the new weapon.

Back in the present, we discover Grace is still alive and under the control of the also-still-alive Randall. Expect both these characters to do something noteworthy in the future.

Thoughts
Revolution beat out the competition again this week, but ratings are slightly down. My personal assessment? This show is on life support. Not in, you know, the actual world – just in my head. The characters are difficult to connect with and the plotting is meandering, at best, and nonsensical, at worst. I see a ton of good ideas, but they’re muddled under a soupy mixture of poorly conceived storytelling. I’m slightly sad because I hate to be this critical about such an initially ambitious and promising show. My weakness has and always will be for stories that dare to shove conventionality out the window, but Revolution is not interested in telling that kind of story. It’s a concept show desperately trying to follow in Lost’s already well-tread footsteps while maintaining a firm grip on their mainstream audience. Since I – and I imagine many of my fellow television fans — don’t need Lost II or a miasma of characters and storylines appealing to the “masses,” I think I might be done.


Hayley has other interests besides just nerdy TV shows. She also is a big fan of thinking. She ponders the great mysteries of life, like how more of her time can be devoted to watching those nerdy TV shows.

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , ,

revolution recapping: plague dogs

Previously on Revolution: No Quarter

There are only two ways to watch Revolution: with other people as you laugh and cackle at the bizarre dialogue, “retro violence”, and sea of scowling faces; or alone, like me, drowning your gripes and surprising outbursts of emotion in a bowl of melting ice cream.

Last night’s episode was weird, okay? I don’t know if I’d go as far to say it was good, but it successfully achieved . . . something.

Plot

Charlie, Miles and Nora reunite with Maggie and Aaron. We find out that Uncle Miles is planning on leaving Charlie (just like everyone else in her life . . .) and that after the blackout Maggie tried really, really hard to get back to orphaned England and her jolly good kids (or maybe it was the other way around).

A crazy person with a hastily sketched out personality – that largely revolves around his aforementioned craziness – sets his (plague?) dogs on our semi-likeable band of heroes, severs an artery in Maggie’s leg, and kidnaps Charlie. Miles and not-Nate (oh yeah, he’s back) save the day by killing the crazy person. They release Charlie before returning to the rest of the group in time to be with Maggie as she dies.

Meanwhile, through a tornado-assisted miracle, Danny escapes the clutches of the Monroe militia. Then, through an idiotically misguided act of kindness, Danny is recaptured.

Talking Points

Snoozing

I was kind of bored for awhile. Rabid dogs, crazy guy, attractive people fighting and scowling — how could this be boring? I don’t know . . .  Maybe because we keep delving into poorly realized character development. Like Charlie and her abandonment issues. Or Nora and her feelings or non-feelings for her former flame Miles.  Maybe I like The Walking Dead so much because zombies appear and bite someone’s throat out whenever the awkward character dynamics threaten to get out of hand.

Plot progression

Where did we go in this episode? Absolutely nowhere (except that we’re down one blond British lady). So Miles isn’t going to leave Charlie. Big whoop, I didn’t even realize that was a possibility till the first five minutes of this episode. Danny has neither risen nor fallen in my estimations – he did exactly what I expected of him (which led him absolutely nowhere as usual). Gah, let’s go somewhere, guys! We have the whole planet to explore, infinite relationships and moral intricacies to create and examine! And instead we’re still tripping around the backwater edges of some eastern state waiting for crazy people and their dogs to capture us.

And yet . . .

Here’s the weird thing: the last twenty minutes kind of worked for me. I know it was burdened with the same clunky plotting and silly exchanges – and maybe the late hour was enough to mellow my overly critical brain to a pile of mush – but things started clicking. I mean, come on: Maggie giving up on finding her children and resorting to suicide? That was pretty sad. Not-Nate heroically joining Miles to rescue Charlie? That was sort of romantic (even though I wish their relationship was built on more than a random water meeting). Rachel leaving her children to turn herself in to her husband’s brother? Hmm that’s kind of intriguing. Touché, Revolution. I guess I’ll be back next week.

She won’t be.

News

Hey 18-49 year olds, what are you watching on Monday nights? According to the completely reliable Nielson ratings, you’re watching Revolution! Up against Hawaii 5-0 and Castle, my little pseudo-post-apocalyptic mutt is actually dominating. Take that, crime.

Hayley has other interests besides just nerdy TV shows. She also is a big fan of thinking. She ponders the great mysteries of life, like how more of her time can be devoted to watching those nerdy TV shows.

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

revolution recapping: chained heat

This may have been inevitable, but I find myself – slightly against my will – liking Revolution more and more. Sword fights, faked deaths, ethical justifications, and a wrist gun? My poor brain can’t resist.

Plot

  • The gang (Miles, Charlie, Aaron, and Maggie) are off to find Nora, an explosives expert who Miles insists they need to rescue Danny.
  • Charlie learns an important lesson: sometimes you should let Uncle Miles kill ruthless bounty hunters in cold blood.
  • Miles takes off on his own to rescue Nora from a militia prison camp, leaving Charlie, Matt, and Maggie.
  • Maggie gets a back story: she keeps her defunct iPhone since the photos trapped inside are the last reminders of her children from across the pond.
  • Charlie catches up to Miles – after sneakily handcuffing her stalker, not-Nate.
  • Apparently, Nora didn’t need to be rescued. She was at the slave camp to steal a sniper gun from the warden.
  • Charlie volunteers to use Nora’s nifty wrist gun to shoot the warden. But wait? Isn’t she a sweet, innocent girl? Nope! Flashbacks reveal that Charlie’s mother, Rachel, was sort of a bad ass – and apparently the apple doesn’t fall very far from the presumed dead tree.
  • Charlie ends up killing the warden and another militia man as she, Miles, and Nora liberate the prison camp.
  • Nora’s resistance tattoo (an American flag that’s missing a few stars) is revealed, and Miles doesn’t like it.
  • Maggie and Aaron, embarking on a side story, don’t make it to Grace’s house in time to hand the mysterious woman Ben’s necklace. Randall got their first! Who’s Randall? I don’t know, but Grace does – or at least she did.
  • And twist! Rachel, Charlie and Danny’s mother, is alive and a prisoner of evil Monroe!

Talking Points

Danny

So let’s get something out of the way: Danny is an idiot. Last week, I compared Danny to a llama, but that’s unfair to llamas. Llamas at least know how to stay silent. Why does this guy keep talking? He practically got his father killed because of his big mouth (and quivering crossbow), and now he taunts his captor as a morally misaligned murderer? You know something funny about morally misaligned murderers? They’re not that forgiving to mop-topped young brats with an apparent death wish. This isn’t the actor’s fault, I should add – and maybe it’s actually no one’s fault. I just think that since a lot of this show currently hinges on rescuing this silly guy it would be nice to make him slightly more appealing . . . or intelligent.

The Abram Effect

Oh, J.J. Abrams, I’ll follow you wherever you lead – even though all that usually gets me is a closet full of Rambaldi junk and a forgotten smoke monster. I’m genuinely hopeful for the direction of this show, and I’m especially looking forward to further intrigue surrounding Monroe, Rachel, and the resistance. I think Rachel, in particular, adds a lot to the show’s ensemble. She’s already been given more depth than characters with triple her screen time and it doesn’t hurt that she has some proven acting chops. Monroe seems suitably intriguing and complex, as does his obedient henchmen and the mysterious members of the resistance. If Abrams can resist his trademark slant toward the supernatural, I think we’ll be all set for a fantastical and character-driven adventure.

Complaining (Or a surprising lack thereof)

I have nothing to really complain about this episode (though I did watch it at 6 a.m. this morning in a groggy, pre-coffee haze). Sure, I find Charlie’s perpetual frown and dopey repetitiveness a bit grating (“So you’re militia”?) and I already complained about her unlikeable brother, but that’s nitpicking and I know it. I generally just enjoyed watching the characters prance around and slash each other with swords. It’s fast-paced, somewhat intelligent, and overall intriguing story-telling. It’s not perfect, okay – I get that. But in a sea of nauseating network sitcoms and been-there-done-that drama programs, Revolution offers something refreshingly different and I heartily appreciate that.

Looking Forward

No cancellation rumors! And the preview for next week features a former BSG cylon. It’s like this show is consciously trying to to lure me in – and it might be working.

Hayley has other interests besides just nerdy TV shows. She also is a big fan of thinking. She ponders the great mysteries of life, like how more of her time can be devoted to watching those nerdy TV shows.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,
Advertisements
Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: